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E.g., Saturday, January 20, 2018
E.g., Saturday, January 20, 2018
Question:
Please advise my going to become an economist. I was an average mathematics major as an undergraduate with a G.P.A. of 3.19 overall with a bachelor's degree in applied mathematics. I have about the average IQ for economists, but I know nothing about economics. Now that I am 41 this year, I am thinking of starting anew in a brand new area of applied mathematics. Is this advisable this late in life to switch careers from mathematics to economics given that the two share a common bond in mathematical economics and are theoretical in microeconomics?

Would the transition be better if I pursued pure mathematics instead, because my experiences has been lately in proof making? What can I look forward to? How and what should I be looking into, to start off, if economics is a good choice? I am a highly curious person. Plus, I have worked hard, I have been doing pure mathematics on my own since 2004 until presently; but, it has been slow going; so, I thought that by going into something that has a better return in investments of my intellectual energy, I should try microeconomics?
Answer:

The prospect of a mid-life career change would be daunting for anyone.  In the end, you’ll have to make that difficult decision on your own.  But I can give you a few tips on how you might begin to explore whether a career in economics...

Question:
A commodity (let's say a vegetable like squash or tomato) that is grown in Mexico and transported to the US and is being sold at 1.29/lb.
After about a month when the commodity has less than 2 weeks of shelf life it may be sold at .69/lb and then discarded after another week.

1) Why would the store not further discount these items at let's say .30/lb to clear the complete stock? ( I understand it is so as not to let the global/US prices of the commodity go down.)
2) Is wasting better for the store than to sell it at a discount?
3) Even if customers stop buying fresh commodity and start to wait until the price goes down to .30/lb. Isn't it economically profitable to the store to actually sell it than waste it ?

Thanks
Answer:

Food waste arises from preferences, incentives, and constraints. Retailers have time and other resource constraints which implies that it simply will not be worth it to sell every last item of food in every instance. It can be said that there is...

Question:
Hi there,

Okay, so this is going to be a really stupid question but I need to know the answer to this. There is a message board about collecting video games and we got into a argument about the definition of the word "rarity." With these games, we all know the exact amount of copies printed for each title. Say Game A has 2000 copies printed and Game B has 5000 copies printed. Assuming that no copies are lost or destroyed, Game A will always be rarer, correct? Someone else is arguing that the availability of copies on the secondary market changes this.

If Game A has 20 copies available on the marketplace right now and Game B only has 2 copies, would Game B be considered to be rarer overall? At that moment in time, sure, but overall, I would say no. Are either of us correct? Would the monetary value of the game on the secondary market change the definition of rarity? Thanks for your time!
Answer:

In the strictest (or standard) sense of the word, you would be correct that game A is “rarer”, given that there are fewer of these in existence than game B. However, the other person is not totally wrong because, in the words of economists, the “...

Question:
I've read that the total bank bailout was just under 30 trillion dollars http://ritholtz.com/2011/12/bailout-total-29-616-trillion-dollars/ I don't understand the purpose of the bailout: why did the Federal Reserve give out money to the banks instead of buying up the bad mortgages? I thought that money doesn't trickle down, but instead grows and multiplies from below. Am I misunderstanding the purpose of the bailout?
Answer:

Without questioning the specific numbers cited in the study, I would argue that much of the total does not represent a bailout of banks in a conventional sense. For example, $10T in central bank liquidity swaps refers to agreements between the...

Question:
This is more of a speculative, hypothetical question. I’m working on a novel in which the wealth of the previous generation is distributed randomly into the next generation. The wealth isn’t distributed equally – in other words, there are the same number of wealthy people from one generation to the other, but there’s no predicting who those new people will be. Once the new generation has the money, they can spend it as they like. So I’ve been speculating – how would that economy look different than our own? Wealthy families wouldn’t be able to pass on wealth – instead, a young person in a slum could be the lucky recipient. What kind of economy would that create?
Answer:

Thank you for your question. The economies would look very different. Your hypothetical world seems analogous to one that imposes a 100% estate tax and uses a lottery to transfer any tax collected back to the economy. Naturally, individuals...

Question:
I was wondering if there are any threats that could cause regression or the stop of progression in the arena football league. I know the Arena football league is trying to expand in order to create more revenue but their business models have been poor in the past. Wondering what's your take on the subject and what environmental factors could prohibit this development
Answer:

If I understand your question correctly, you are asking about factors that will determine the success or failure of the Arena Football League.  As with any firm or industry, ‘economic’ success or failure depends on the ability of the firm or...

Question:
If budgets have to be approved by Congress before they get signed by the President, why does the Congress again have to approve an increase in the borrowing limits?

If govt debt is at $10 trillion, and Congress approves a budget with a budget deficit of $1 trillion, isn't it implied that the administration can implement the budget only by borrowing an extra trillion?
Answer:

Just to be clear, “the debt limit is the total amount of money that the United States government is authorized to borrow to meet its existing legal obligations, including Social Security and Medicare benefits, military salaries, interest on the...

Question:
I read a summary of perfect competition which said that:
1. All market participants have perfect knowledge.
2. Excess profit is only possible in the short run.

If all participants have perfect knowledge, wouldn't all producers instantly know about excess profit opportunities, causing all of them to switch to producing that product at the same time, causing the price to crash and all of them to experience losses? Or, with second-order knowledge, wouldn't they all know that they all knew about the opportunity, and none of them would switch?

Is there a resolution to this perfect market dilemma?
Answer:

"I read a summary of perfect competition which said that: 1. All market participants have perfect knowledge."

An assumption that a market M for a good Q is a "perfectly competitive market" is not a presumption of perfect knowledge...

Question:
What would be the economic impact of eliminating the federal income tax system and replacing it with a national consumption tax such as the FairTax?
Answer:

This policy change would redistribute income from lower to higher income households because the current income tax is progressive while the flat tax would not be as progressive, if at all.

The change would also lead to the double taxation...

Question:
Hello!

I would humbly like to inquire whether this theory explains the drift apart of labor productivity and worker wage as a result of the progress of mechanization. And also I would like to know if it is new and worthy of exhaustive research.

"Increased productivity does not cause nor correspond with an increase in labor compensation. Wages increase in relation to the need for added and specialized skills and the relative scarcity of available labor possessing these. This carries over to skills needed to deploy and operate capital. If capital needs labor with added and specialized skills for it to operate, it will drive the need for higher paid, more specialized workers. The more autonomous the capital is corresponds with an increasingly inverse or stagnant relationship between real labor compensation and increased productivity. Productivity, in itself, is not a driver of added worth to labor." - Michael Nogle July 4, 2016

I am an avid student of history, and social studies, including economics, in my pursuit to gain my secondary teaching credentials. I also have two master degrees, one in liberal studies. I came up with this as a result of these studies. I believe the logic is sound and cannot think of specific areas where my model does not fit. My training in liberal studies has taught me that it is time to ask specialists for further insight.

I hope to hear from you soon.

Mike Nogle
Answer:

Your proposed theory of wage setting appears to be consistent with the way that most economists would approach this issue.  That is, most economists would accept that an individual’s wage is determined by the “human capital” – i.e., skills,...

Question:
Stock Market Question.

There is something very basic and fundamental about how the stock market works that I have never understood and always wondered about.

I understand that a company issues a certain fixed number of shares so the value of those shares are subject to the law of supply and demand. However, it seems like, at any given moment I, and anyone else, can buy or sell any number of shares at the current stock price. So what is the actual mechanism that determines the change in stock price?

If I look at the stock price of company X and see it is selling for $100 per share I, and anyone else, can decide to buy one share at the market price of $100, or one million shares at the market price of $100. So what actually makes the stock price of company X actually move up to $100.01 per share or down to $99.99 per share? It doesn't seem like the stock price would move up unless all available shares were already purchased, or down unless there were people willing to sell shares for less than the market asking price at any given moment.
Answer:

The answer is that stock prices are indeed determined by supply and demand. If you see no change in price when you trade, it is because the amounts you are trading are relatively small. If you try to buy or sell a particularly large amount at one...

Question:
Although I studied economics at an undergraduate level and have spent almost a decade working for financial advisers, I've never understood the idea of target inflation ranges or why some countries are described as 'struggling with low inflation'. Is inflation a measure of the rising cost of living? Or is it a measure of the declining value of money? Perhaps it's both i.e. some sort of inverse relationship? Why do economies target an inflation range? I can't understand why we would want the cost of living to rise or want the value of our money to fall. If a country has low inflation, does that mean the cost of living is increasing at a low rate? And wouldn't that be a good thing for the population? Taking that a step further, wouldn't it be even better if the cost of living was declining over time (I believe that's called deflation)? Why is deflation a bad thing? Thanks in advance!
Answer:

If prices are not rising at all over time or even falling, it would act as an disincentive for firms to produce goods for the market. For durables, if people expect prices to fall, they will wait. Since most financial contracts are denominated in...

Question:
So, my question might be more philosophical than economical, but it's wracking my brain and I can't seem to find an answer.

It is about currency and how our money is no longer backed by "gold." Money (i.e. coins and bills) in essence is the same as chips at a casino. At the end of the day, if I choose, I could cash in my chips and get something of value for them. MONEY.

Back in the day, before Jimmy Carter, it was the same way, that, at any time, I could cash in my MONEY for GOLD. (which although has no intrinsic value, is determined to HAVE value.)

So, here is my question.....and I hope I explain it well. A lot of people out there are asking "why can't we just print more money and solve the poverty problem?" Terms like "inflation" and the "devaluing of the dollar" are the usual buzz answers to that question. Also, people give the example that if the government were to print more money and just give everyone $50,000, then everyone would go out and buy things, thus making THINGS more in short supply, thus driving up the price of things. (simple supply/demand economics) But this is where I'm curious. With TRUE unemployment probably somewhere around 15% in this country, if DEMAND rose, then companies would WANT to hire more people and build more processing plants to keep up with demand and raise their profits. So, the influx of cash (printed money) would seem to solve the unemployment problem.

So, here is where I'm confused.....if I apply the same idea of "printing more money and handing it out to the public" to my casino example, then that would be like the casino giving everyone at the poker table an extra $100 in chips to play with. But here's the catch. I understand the PROBLEM with doing that at the casino, because if you give people all these extra chips, then at the end of the night, when people CASH OUT, there will not be enough money in the vault to pay for all the chips. Hence the problem.

But how does that relate to American economics since there is no "cashing out" procedure. If the government gave everyone a bunch more money, there is no "checks and balances" since no one, at the end of the day, goes to the cashier station and exchanges their "chips" (money in this case) for something of value.

Exchanging your chips at the end of the day for MONEY back (which has value in our eyes) makes sense, hence why you can't give out more chips than the money you have in the vault. But it seems the American dollar is not a paper representation of the "money in the vault" no one goes to cash in their money in America.

So I don't understand how currency works and why we can't just print more money since it really isn't representative of anything of value.

Please explain, as I cant find a good answer anywhere online.

(I hope this question wasn't convoluted.)

Thank you so much for your time
Answer:

Let me try to remove some of the confusion. Imagine the only good in the economy is corn and corn costs $1 a pound, and imagine you and all others earn $100 a month. Each month you buy 100 lbs of corn exchanging $1 for 1 lb of corn; so the real...

Question:
What correlations exist, if any, between a country's age distribution and its economic output? Additionally, does the relative shape of a country's population pyramid seem to give any indication of future performance in (a sector of) the stock market? I have read that a country with an age distribution like an inverted pyramid (more older people than young people) requires a greater investment in healthcare, and the opposite shape (non-inverted pyramid) requires a greater investment in education. Therefore, is it a stretch to conclude that the healthcare sector in a country with an inverted pyramid age distribution will fair better than it would with a non-inverted pyramid in the same country?

Also, is there a name for the sub-field of economics that studies how demographics is related to economy?
Answer:

The question of how demographics relate to economic issues (e.g., poverty, economic growth) has been at the forefront of economics ever since its infancy as a science. For instance, Rev. Malthus (1766-1834) controversially suggested that...

Question:
In light of the recent layoffs at John Deere and its suppliers, how does the agriculture sector rate compared to the rest of the economy that seems to be rebounding? How long can we expect sluggish commodity prices?
Answer:

As the layoffs suggest, a large part of agriculture, in this case the crop sector of agriculture, has seen a significant reduction in prices and incomes over the past two years. This drop in prices and incomes can mainly be linked to a surge in U...

Question:
Why is the growth of GDP so important? I understand that we want living standards to go up in the aggregate, but if the economy produced the same amount of goods/services per year for, say, three years, would that be catastrophic in itself (i.e., aside from policymakers and economists freaking out about it)?
Answer:

The event that you are referring to is what economists call recessions. During recessions, GDP drops or grows significantly below normal times for a period of usually less than two years. Recessions are dreaded by many but not all economists....

Question:
Hello,

I was wondering whether a recession is the opposite of inflation or is it the opposite of economic growth. What is it, really, the opposite of?

Thank you
Answer:

A recession is a period of general economic decline, a contraction in the GDP for six months (two consecutive quarters) or longer. In that sense, they represent negative growth.

Question:
I would like to understand how the National Negotiated barrow and gilt price relate to Peoria and interior Missouri live hogs price, futures hog contracts and profit for the farmer, and if possible have a margin profit table from 2013 up to date.
Answer:

To explore the relationship between the Peoria live hog price, Interior Missouri live hog price, National negotiated prior day purchase base price, National negotiated slaughter base price, CME lean hog futures price, and farrow to finish profit...

Question:
Are there any studies that address the weighted effects of different causes for loss of manufacturing jobs such as automation secular changes in purchasing and international trade?
Answer:

You can try

David H. Autor & David Dorn & Gordon H. Hanson, 2016. "The China Shock: Learning from Labor Market Adjustment to Large Changes in Trade," Annual...

Question:
I have a question about the Federal Reserve system at the heart of our monetary system. I have heard many accounts and explanations. I am very wary of anything I read in the news, and even more wary of what our government does. Was the act actually concocted on a private island by powerful, wealthy bankers? Was president Wilson actually remorseful of the passage of the act and its effect? Was the act passed under less than the usual standard of congressional consensus and due process? Can you comment on debt as a dynamic within the Fed? Should the public be wary of the lack of transparency? I have absolutely no faith in our system's ability to promote anyone else's interest, except the wealthy and big business. Any cause for optimism otherwise? Can you suggest a good book on the Fed? Thanks.
Answer:

The Federal Reserve has a long history as the nation’s central bank. While there have undoubtedly been many changes in the U.S. economy, banking, and the financial sector since the passage of the Federal Reserve Act in 1913, much of the structure...

Question:
Hello economists! Regarding people who are unemployed --if every one of them went through the motions and started their own small business today (let's assume that part goes off without a hitch) would the economy benefit from the increased occupied jobs, or have no net change from a proportional increase in competition?

Or something completely different?
Answer:

There are many assumptions underlying your question. To begin with, we have to ask, why are people currently unemployed? assuming businesses are in it to maximize their profits, then if they are not hiring (which is why there are unemployed...

Question:
Would slowing down immigration and blocking illegals from working in the US automatically cause the minimum wage to rise on its own?
Answer:

Minimum wages are wage floors set by law, not by the market. They, however, are subject to political pressure from citizens. If, say, hypothetically, all immigration, legal or otherwise, was stopped, then there would be a stronger demand to hire...

Question:
I am working on a research project of agriculture cooperatives and their locations across the United States. I have found several sources that list the coops by name and give the main office corporate address, but I have been unable to find a list of cooperative and their operating branches. Does such a list exist?
Answer:

To my knowledge, a publically-accessible national listing of all the agricultural cooperatives and their branches does not exist. However, many states have cooperative associations or cooperative development centers that likely maintain a list of...

Question:
What would be the costs and benefits of returning to the gold standard?
Answer:

Under the gold system, either gold circulates as money, or there is a fixed relationship between the amount of currency in circulation and the amount of gold, given the dollar price of gold. In either case, it means that a valuable resource which...

Question:
If I run a manufacturing company and I pay people to do work, presumably those hours are in the manufacturing sector when it comes to measuring the nations's productivity. If I also pay consultants [who's hours belong in the service sector] to help with that manufacturing volume, are those hours counted as service or as manufacturing?
Answer:

The output determines which sector a particular activity falls under. If the output is a good (product), then it falls under the manufacturing sector. If the output is a service, then it falls under the service sector.

In your particular...

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